sageoflogic:

thenapturalone:

seriouslyamerica:

JOEY: Uh, Mr. Morgan. Is there any chance we could get Kat to take her Mydol before she comes to class?

MR. MORGAN: Some day you’re gonna get bitch-slapped and I’m not gonna do a thing to stop it. And Kat. I want to thank you for your point of view. I know how difficult it must be for you to overcome all those years of upper middle class suburban oppression. It must be tough. But the next time you storm around the PTA crusading for better lunch meat, or whatever it is you white girls complain about, ask them why they can’t buy a book written by a black man!

WHITE RASTA CHORUS: That’s right mon!

MR. MORGAN: Don’t even get me started on you two!

BEST SCENE.

EVER.

WHITE RASTA CHORUS


DID YOU MEAN? “Half the male stoners at my school” maybe? xD

(via ludio)


fuckyeahfeminists:

[x]

love love love love this.

(via ludio)



dhrupad:

بھُمِکا भुमिका Bhumika, The Role (1977)

Written in the seventies, the autobiography deals primarily with Hansa Wadkar’s life in the forties and fifties. Her yearning for a relationship in which she is valued as a person remains unfulfilled, for each man in her life—her uncle, her husband, and the lovers in whom she places her hopes—relates to her ultimately in a script that is endorsed by tradition and has no room for her new, individualist requirements. When she eventually manages to bring a pregnancy to term and have the baby she has not for many years been allowed to have (since her career would be interrupted and her figure affected), there is no social space in which she can relate to her child as she wants to. Her aspirations for independence and for some control over the money she earned leave her, toward the end of her life, lonely and isolated in a world that seems ot have no other way of acknowledging or addressing those desires.

 If the social Imaginary comes together and holds secure around Shivani’s uppercaste family women, for Hansa Wadkar, who speaks from outside that architecture, nothing holds together, not even herself, and sometimes not even her story. The nation has no space in its centers for such women, no patience with their dreams.

Women Writing in India: The Twentieth Centuryby Susie J. Tharu & Ke Lalita

(via stopwhitewashing)


fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: a photo of Audre Lorde’s face. She is adjusting her glasses. End description.]
torrid-wind:

“That’s why we exist, so that another generation of lesbians of color will not have to invent themselves, or their history all over again.”
- Mother-Sister Audre Lorde (1934-1992)

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: a photo of Audre Lorde’s face. She is adjusting her glasses. End description.]

torrid-wind:

“That’s why we exist, so that another generation of lesbians of color will not have to invent themselves, or their history all over again.”

- Mother-Sister Audre Lorde (1934-1992)


youmightbeaconservative:

prochoicetruth:

Today in Benghazi- a pro-America demonstration in response to the attack on our embassy.

If you condemn Islam as a religion of violence and terrorism, you might be a conservative

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)


There’s a poisonous double standard in our society which says that it’s reverse-sexist and wrong for women to feel threatened by creepy-awkward male behaviour because our fear implies that we hold the negative, stereotypical view that All Men Are Predators, but that if we’re raped or sexually assaulted by any man with whom we’ve had prior social interaction – and particularly if he’s expressed some sexual or romantic interest in us during that time – it’s reasonable for observers to ask what precautions we took to prevent the assault from happening, or to suggest that we maybe led the guy on by not stating our feelings plainly. The result is a situation where women are punished if we reject, avoid or identify creepy men, and then told it’s our fault if we’re assaulted by someone we plainly ought to have rejected, avoided, identified.



unobject:

trans women couples from the 1960’s.

-photographed by Christer Strömholm

(via transqueermediaexchange)


The appropriation of BDSM imagery is problematic because while community members understand that it is important to be sensitive to the needs, boundaries, and rules of players in order for a scene to function fairly and enjoyably, mainstream porn is primarily about getting off as quickly as possible. Add to that a disgraceful lack of sexual education (both in safety and in pleasure) across the country, and a general belief perpetuated by the media that women are sexual objects to be consumed, and you have a rape culture that started by borrowing from BDSM’s imagery without reading its rules.

Stacey May Fowles, The Fantasy of Acceptable “Non-Consent”: Why the Female Sexual Submissive Scares Us (and Why She Shouldn’t)

(via whatispatriarchy)


Job security

shitmystudentswrite:

Archeology is the study of things by scholars so they can teach students.


People who say it cannot be done should not interrupt those who are doing it.
George Bernard Shaw (via nathanielstuart)

(via thefistofartemis)


Fremdschamen

feministcookingshow:

Vicarious embarrassment in German.